Salt of the Earth: sustaining macaws in the Amazon

Red and green macaws at the clay lick

This is our fourth blog in the Las Piedras guest blog series, following the adventures from the WildFF Friends and Family trip. Check out David’s journey to the Las Piedras Amazon Center to learn more about the group’s arrival at this jungle paradise. Why do macaws in the Amazon need clay licks? Macaws are beautiful, colorful, social birds and are the largest of the parrot family. Although their diet is…

Eat or be eaten: the role of apex predators

Jaguar in the Amazon by Tom Ambrose

The rainforest produces at least three quarters of the precipitation it depends on. Every day, water is released through the leaves, rises in the air and forms clouds. When rain clouds hit cooler air they release their water in the form of rain. Even when it’s not raining, the cloud cover keeps the rainforest humid and warm. Because of plentiful rain, food and shelter the rainforest has the most density…

Our journey to the Las Piedras Amazon Center

The rainforest covers 1 700 million hectares, an area the size of South America, and 6% of the Earth's surface.

This is our second blog in the Las Piedras guest blog series. Check out Catherine’s layers of complexity to learn more about the design of the rainforest canopy. After several hours, we saw the sign to our destination from the river. On our journey, we passed many areas where the forest had already been cut down and replaced by agriculture. We could easily see the dramatic difference from the river. The…

Layers of Complexity: Secrets of the Rainforest Canopy

In January, my husband David and I had a rare opportunity to spend almost two weeks in the remote rainforest of the Las Piedras region of South-eastern Peru during the height of the rainy season. It took Liz Feldman – WildFF founding board member and our daughter – a year to organise this special adventure. Her diligent planning meant that 21 family members and friends could experience the wonders of…

Protecting vulnerable forests in the Las Piedras region

Scarlet macaw

It is with great excitement that the NGO Junglekeepers Peru announces it has officially protected a 2,780 acre (1,125 ha) Brazil nut concession in Peru’s Las Piedras watershed. This increases the amount of protected rainforests in the middle Las Piedras River to 15,960 acres (6,459 ha) of interconnected rainforests. The Las Piedras watershed Part of the Tropical Andes hotspot, this watershed is one the most biodiverse places in the world….

Five years, 50 leaders connected

Future Leaders 2018 t-shirts

FIVE YEARS, 50 LEADERS CONNECTED: THE FINAL YEAR OF OUR FUTURE LEADERS PILOT PROGRAM IN THE AMAZON RAINFOREST ‘The program has allowed me to learn from the experiences of other local leaders, and has taught me that nothing is impossible if you work together’ – Cecilia Borde Quispe, Future Leader and ecotourism graduate In our final year, we reached an exciting milestone: 50 young leaders are now connected through the…

How can the power of storytelling help innovate solutions to environmental challenges?

WildFF’s Future Leaders Program in Madre de Dios, Peru

Wild Forests & Fauna (WildFF) will be hosting the fifth and final year of a 5 year pilot program in the Peruvian Amazon: the Future Leaders summit. Taking place between January 14-18, 2018, the summit will bring together 10-20 local youth leaders from both the Amazon gateway city of Puerto Maldonado and rural communities in the Las Piedras river to collaborate on sustainable business solutions to local challenges. The program…

Community Makes Conservation

Group at the Las Piedras Amazon Center

Involving people in conservation and development at LPAC   The vision behind LPAC was to build a place in the Peruvian Amazon where people would come to study and connect with the incredible rainforest ecosystem while supporting the protection and sustainable development of the local region. Run by our Peruvian partners ARCAmazon, LPAC is a model for sustainable development in a very special area of Madre de Dios: the Las…

El viaje de una Innovadora: desde el Amazonas Peruano a un ‘Fulbright’ en la Florida

Tania Romero Bautista in the Amazon

También puedes leer este articulo en ingles. Durante el mes de enero del presente año la Red Innova visitó con entusiasmo la región Madre de Dios, los jóvenes participantes desde entonces han puesto en marcha sus ideas en esta región del Perú. Tania Romero Bautista, una de las primeras innovadoras que se unió al programa desde sus inicios, se encuentra estudiando como becaria Fulbright un master en desarrollo sostenible en…